Charlottenburg English landscape garden

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318. The principal examples of the English style in Prussia are the royal gardens at the summer residence of Charlottenburg, near Berlin, begun by Frederick the Great, but chiefly laid out during the reign of Frederick William II. They are not extensive, and are situated on a dull sandy flat, washed by the Spree; under which unfavourable circumstances it would be wonderful if they were very attractive. In one part of these gardens, a Doric mausoleum of great beauty contains the ashes of the much-lamented queen. A dark avenue of Scotch pines leads to a circle of the same trees, 150 feet in diameter. Interior circles are formed of cypresses and weeping-willows; and within these is a border of white roses and white lilies (Lilium candidum L.). The form of the mausoleum is oblong, and its end projects from this interior circle, directly opposite the covered avenue. A few steps descend from the entrance to a platform, upon which, on a sarcophagus, is a reclining figure of the queen; a stair at one side leads to the door of a vault containing her remains.